Citrus Health Benefits – Uncle Matt's Organic http://www.unclematts.com Organic Juices and Beverages | Love at First Sip Sat, 15 Sep 2018 16:04:40 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.8 http://www.unclematts.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/cropped-umo-logo-on-wood-e1511126022201-32x32.png Citrus Health Benefits – Uncle Matt's Organic http://www.unclematts.com 32 32 Orange Juice for Better Vision http://www.unclematts.com/orange-juice-for-better-vision/ Mon, 20 Aug 2018 14:44:09 +0000 http://www.unclematts.com/?p=3413 more]]> Of all the juices that can offer benefits to your eyes, orange and grapefruit juices rank right at the top. These two power packed beverages contain nutrients are rich in vitamins necessary to the function of the eyes. Vitamins A and C are two antioxidants that pack a powerful punch when it comes to enriching the eyes. Folate, or vitamin B9, is also an important antioxidant found in both fruits. Orange juice in particular promotes healthy ocular blood vessels, and can reduce the risk of nuclear cataracts (clouding in the center of your lens that can make you see multiple images), according to the American Optometric Association.

In a 15-year study of 2,000 Australian adults ages 50 and over, researchers found that an orange — or a couple cups of orange juice a day — was helpful at keeping macular degeneration, or the disease that causes loss of vision, at bay. The research demonstrated that participants who had a simple serving of oranges (or orange juice) reduced their risk of getting age-related macular degeneration 15 years later by more than 60%. Flavonoids — or the chemicals that give oranges their bright color — appeared to be particularly helpful at preventing this particular eye disease. Interestingly, oranges had superior eye benefits than other foods that had flavonoids like apples.

Getting 500 mg/day of vitamin C can slow the “the progression of advanced age-related macular degeneration by about 25 percent and visual acuity loss by 19 percent in individuals at high-risk for the disease,” according to an Age-Related Eye Disease Study. OJ is one of the highest sources of vitamin C, according to the USDA.

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The amazing health benefits of grapefruit http://www.unclematts.com/the-amazing-health-benefits-of-grapefruit-2/ Tue, 24 Jul 2018 20:16:18 +0000 http://www.unclematts.com/?p=3400 more]]> Grapefruit is a member of the citrus family and grapefruit gets its name from the way it clusters on a tree branch (like grapes!). Its origins date back to the early 1800s in the Caribbean; it’s believed to be a cross between a Pomelo and another citrus fruit. According to India’s National Institute of Nutrition, grapefruit contains 92% moisture and is also a low carb fruit loaded in vitamin C, antioxidants, and other minerals. But what makes grapefruit so special? Read on to find out.

1. Reduces Acidity

The citric acid in grapefruit creates an alkaline reaction post digestion. This helps support your body’s natural cold, cough and flu fighters. The bitter properties from the essence called naringin boost the digestive process, aiding to immunity support.

2. Metabolism Booster

Grapefruit contains plant compounds that reduce insulin levels and promote weight loss. Scientists at the American Nutrition and Medical Research Center showed that this fiber rich fruit makes you feel full for longer, thus functioning as an excellent weight loss suppressant. What’s more, lower starches in grapefruit make it a safe alternative for may diabetics hoping to satisfy their sweet tooth.

3. Lowers Stroke Risk

A study by the American Heart Association revealed that eating higher amounts of grapefruit may lower ischemic (blood clot related) stroke and intracerebral stroke risk. Women who consumed a higher quantity of grapefruit had a 19% lower risk than women who consumed the least.

4. Bone Booster

Texas A&M University’s Vegetable and Fruit Improvement research demonstrated that both orange and grapefruit juice — when regularly given to lab rats — prevented osteoporosis, long considered an unavoidable disease of aging.

5. Vitamin C… and More

Grapefruit has Vitamin C, but it is now established that phytochemicals contained in grapefruit can also aid symptoms of a myriad of chronic diseases. Epidemiological studies have shown a significant inverse association between grapefruit intake and cardiovascular mortality .What’s more, there is supporting evidence that grapefruit acts as a cancer fighter, too.

With all this goodness surrounding grapefruit, what’s not to love? Stock up on Uncle Matt’s Organic Grapefruit juice, available nationwide. Cheers to your health!

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Feeling tired? Forget coffee, have a glass of orange juice! http://www.unclematts.com/feeling-tired-forget-coffee-have-a-glass-of-orange-juice/ Tue, 19 Jun 2018 18:21:43 +0000 http://www.unclematts.com/?p=3267 more]]> Feeling tired and groggy? Don’t automatically go make a pot of coffee. Instead, reach for a glass of organic orange juice! Recent research has found that orange juice boosts alertness, concentration and reaction times. Even better, the effects last for hours post consumption, especially with those who have juice with breakfast rather than mid-afternoon.

Researchers at Reading University put 24 men through a battery of mental tests on two different days. The results? On one of the days, the men consumed orange juice before being put through their paces. On the other day, a flavored sugary water was provided that looked and tasted similar to orange juice.

When the subjects drank the real orange juice, they performed better on tests of speed and attention. They also felt alert six hours later, the European Journal of Nutrition reports.

It’s believed through research that the effects are due to flavonoids, which are health boosting plant chemicals found in a variety of fruits and veggies, including citrus fruit and orange juice. These improve blood flow to the brain and ease the passage of information between cells. Previous research has concluded that orange juice is good for the brain but those studies were evaluating prolonged use. This particular latest research found that just 240ml a day — a small glass — is beneficial.

We’ll say cheers to that!

 

Source: Daily Mail

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The Hesperidin in Florida Orange Juice has Surprising Health Benefits http://www.unclematts.com/the-hesperidin-in-florida-orange-juice-has-surprising-health-benefits/ Wed, 13 Jun 2018 18:55:06 +0000 http://www.unclematts.com/?p=3263 more]]> Vitamin C isn’t the only reason you should reach for a glass of 100% Orange Juice. Citrus fruits, including orange juice, contain potent antioxidant-like compounds called bioflavonoids and one in particular has many health benefits. While you may be familiar with resveratrol, found in red wine, or catechin, a component of green tea, a related plant compound called hesperidin is lesser known.

What is Hesperidin?

Hesperidin is a bioflavonoid, a type of plant compound with antioxidant properties that may play a role in fighting inflammation, maintaining good blood sugar levels, and supporting brain and heart health. Hesperidin is found almost exclusively in citrus fruits, and it is particularly high in oranges and 100% orange juice.

Most of the hesperidin is found in the peel and membranes of the orange. When oranges are pressed to make 100% orange juice, the hesperidin is extracted from the peel, pulp, and membranes. This helps to make 100% orange juice one of the best food sources of hesperidin.

Benefits of Hesperidin

Many of the health benefits from hesperidin come from its positive effects on decreasing inflammation and supporting blood vessel health. Hesperidin appears to act in conjunction with the nutrients found in citrus fruits to neutralize free radicals and lower your risk of heart disease and diabetes, improve your circulation, and protect your brain function as you age.

  1. Improved Heart Health. Hesperidin supports a healthy heart by helping to vasodilate (7,10) or relax, your blood vessels which may lead to lower blood pressure. Hesperidin also has been shown to positively support endothelial cells that line blood vessels, which also may reduce the risk of heart disease(7,10) Research has shown higher consumption of hesperidin and other bioflavonoids found in citrus to be related to a lower risk of cardiovascular disease. (5,6,8)
  2. Brain Protection. Hesperidin is able to cross the blood-brain barrier and may help reduce inflammation, promote blood flow in the brain, and maintain brain cell health, all of which may have positive effects on cognition. Hesperidin has been shown to have several brain benefits (1) including maintaining mental alertness, supporting executive function skills such as memory and attention, and aiding psycho-motor skills like movement and coordination.
  3. Blood Sugar Control. Hesperidin may play a role in maintaining blood sugar control (4,9) and reducing insulin resistance. Intake of hesperidin and other bioflavonoids in citrus is also linked to lower risk of type 2 diabetes. (11,12)

How to Get Hesperidin in Your Diet

It is rare to find hesperidin in any other food besides citrus. 100% OJ is a great way to get hesperidin in your diet as it is the only fruit juice and the only commonly-consumed food (3) that contains a significant amount of hesperidin.

Source: Florida Dept of Citrus

Studies Cited:

  1. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26280945
  2. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15465737
  3. Bhagwat S, Haytowitz D. USDA Database for the Flavonoid Content of Selected Foods Release 3.2. In. Beltsville, MD: Unites States Department of Agriculture; 2015.
  4. Haidari et al. J Am Coll Nutr. Hesperidin supplementation modulates inflammatory responses following myocardial infarction. 2015; 34 (3):205-11. doi: 10.1080/07315724.2014.891269.
  5. Knekt et al. Am J Clin Nutr. Flavonoid intake and risk of chronic diseases. 2002; 76 (3):560-568.
  6. Mink et al. Am J Clin Nutr. Flavonoid intake and cardiovascular disease mortality: a prospective study in postmenopausal women. 2007; 85 (3):895-909.
  7. Morand et al. Am J Clin Nutr. 2011;93(1):73-80.
  8. Ponzo et al.  J Transl Med. Dietary flavonoid intake and cardiovascular risk: a population-based cohort study. 2015; 13 (1):218. doi: 10.1186/s12967-015-0573-2.
  9. Rangel-Huerta et al.  J Nutr. Normal or High Polyphenol Concentration in Orange Juice Affects Antioxidant Activity, Blood Pressure, and Body Weight in Obese or Overweight Adults. 2015; 145 (8):1808-16. doi: 10.3945/jn.115.213660.
  10. Rendeiro et al. Br J Nutr. 2017;116(12):1999-2010
  11. Sun et al. J Nutr. Urinary Excretion of Select Dietary Polyphenol Metabolites Is Associated with a Lower Risk of Type 2 Diabetes in Proximate but Not Remote Follow-Up in a Prospective Investigation in 2 Cohorts of US Women.2015; 145 (6):1280-8. doi: 10.3945/jn.114.208736.
  12. Tresserra-Rimbau et al. J Nutr. Intake of Total Polyphenols and Some Classes of Polyphenols Is Inversely Associated with Diabetes in Elderly People at High Cardiovascular Disease Risk. 2016; 146 (4):767-777. doi: 10.3945/jn.115.223610.
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Starting Your Day With Orange Juice May Be Really Good For You, According To Science http://www.unclematts.com/starting-your-day-with-orange-juice-may-be-really-good-for-you-according-to-science-study/ Tue, 03 Apr 2018 14:26:48 +0000 http://www.unclematts.com/?p=3220 more]]> Drinking orange juice could help improve brain function in elderly people, according to new research from the University of Reading.

The study saw a group of 37 healthy adults (mean age 67 years) consuming 500ml (just under a pint) of orange juice, daily over an eight week period. At the beginning and end of the eight weeks their memory, reaction time and verbal fluency was measured. These were then combined into one overall score known as ‘global cognitive function’.

The adults showed an 8% overall improvement in global cognitive function after orange juice consumption compared to a control drink (matched for taste and calories) given during a different eight week period. Although subtle, these improvements are significant.

One of the tests of verbal memory required learning a list of words which are then recalled immediately and after a 30 minute delay. An 8% improvement equates to remembering one more word from a shopping list of 15 items. Small improvements such as this over an eight week period could translate into substantial improvements over the lifespan.

While the researchers are not recommending that people drink 500ml of orange juice every day, they believe these findings show that the constituents of orange juice could play an important role in providing brain-boosting nutrients as part of a healthy, balanced diet. They also wish to reinforce the importance of being aware of the nutritional content of fresh fruit juice drinks, relative to daily recommended intake of sugar.

Dr Daniel Lamport, from the University’s School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences and co-author of the study, said: “The population is ageing rapidly across the world. Estimates suggest that the number of persons aged 60 or over could triple by 2100. It’s therefore imperative that we explore simple, cost-effective ways to improve cognitive function in old age.”

Orange juice is a major source of a group of naturally occurring plant phytochemicals known as flavonoids, being particularly rich in a sub-class of flavonoids, known as flavanones. Recent studies from the School of Chemistry, Food and Pharmacy have shown that flavonoids may improve memory through the activation of signalling pathways in the hippocampus, a part of the brain that is associated with learning and memory.

This study is thought to be one of the first to show that regularly consuming orange juice flavanones could have a positive effect on older people’s cognition.

Dr Lamport continued: “Small, easily administered changes to the daily diet, such as eating more flavonoid-rich fruits and vegetables, have the potential to substantially benefit brain health. We know that people find it difficult to sustain big changes to their diet but simple alterations are much easier to maintain permanently.

“More research on the positive effects of flavonoids on cognition is still needed. However, this is an important discovery which strengthens the growing body of evidence that flavonoid rich foodstuffs could play a big role in tackling cognition decline in old age.”

Previous Reading research has shown that other flavonoid rich foods such as blueberries are beneficial for cognition. Research is still ongoing to determine the exact mechanisms by which flavonoids may exert benefits to the brain. Several mechanisms have been proposed such as improved blood flow in the brain and protecting neurons against oxidative damage and increasing the efficiency with which neurons transmit signals.

Chronic consumption of flavanone-rich orange juice is associated with cognitive benefits: an 8-wk, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in healthy older adults 1-3 was published in the March issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

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New study shows vitamin C in orange juice cuts risk of hip fractures http://www.unclematts.com/orange-juice-cuts-risk-of-hip-fractures/ Mon, 19 Mar 2018 16:04:01 +0000 http://www.unclematts.com/?p=3207 more]]> In order to have stronger, healthier bones, all you need to do is to drink orange juice daily. According to a report by The Daily Mail, a new study suggests that increasing your intake of vitamin C can reduce the risk of hip fractures.

Researchers from Zhengzhou University in China carried out a meta-analysis to assess the association of dietary consumption of vitamin C and the risk of hip fracture. In the study, they analyzed data from a total of six previous studies on vitamin C and fracture risk, with more than 10,000 study participants in all. For this study, they observed the vitamin C intake of 2,899 patients with hip fracture. Then, they compared the results with 7,908 healthy volunteers of a similar age. The meta-analysis on vitamin C and its effect on bones revealed that vitamin C consumption, whether by eating foods rich in vitamin C or drinking their juice, make bones stronger and prevents fractures.

The findings of the study revealed that the risk of a hip fracture can be reduced by five percent for every 50 milligrams intake of vitamin C per day, which is equal to nearly one medium-sized orange or one-fourth of a glass of freshly squeezed orange juice. This means that one eight-ounce glass of orange juice could possibly lower the risk by 20 percent, while two glasses could reduce the risk by 40 percent. The researchers concluded that increasing the amount of vitamin C in your diet can reduce the risk of hip fracture. To strengthen bones, vitamin C works by triggering cells known as osteoblasts to become mature bone cells.

“Our results strongly support the idea that increasing dietary vitamin C can decrease the risk of hip fracture,” the researchers wrote.

The study was published in the journal Osteoporosis International.

 

Vitamin C and its functions

Vitamin C is essential for the growth and repair of tissues in every part of the body. It is used to form a key protein that makes skin, tendons, ligaments, and blood vessels. It is also used to heal wounds and form scar tissue, repair and maintain cartilage, bones, and teeth, and help in the absorption of iron. The recommended vitamin C intake for male adults is 90 milligrams per day, while female adults need 75 milligrams of vitamin C a day. Aside from orange and orange juice, other citrus fruits, tomatoes and tomato juice, and potatoes are major sources of vitamin C to the American diet.

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New study suggests grapefruit juice may help control weight gain http://www.unclematts.com/new-study-suggests-grapefruit-juice-may-help-control-weight-gain/ Fri, 19 Jan 2018 22:10:57 +0000 http://www.unclematts.com/?p=3175 more]]> Researchers found mice fed a high-fat diet gained 18 percent less weight when they drank grapefruit juice

BARTOW, Fla. – As the Florida Grapefruit season ramps up, there may be yet another reason to add the fruit to your grocery list.

A new study, yet to be replicated in humans, suggests drinking a glass of 100% grapefruit juice may help control weight gain and lower blood sugar levels.

Researchers at the University of California, Berkeley found that mice fed a high-fat diet gained 18 percent less weight when they drank grapefruit juice compared to mice that drank water. The grapefruit juice-drinking mice also had a 13 to 17 percent decrease in blood sugar levels and increased insulin sensitivity.

While the findings are positive, researchers want to further study the exact cause behind them.

Previous research identified naringin, a bioactive compound in grapefruit juice, as a key agent in weight loss. However, a group of mice who received naringin had lower blood sugar levels than the control group but had no difference in weight, suggesting another component of grapefruit juice is also beneficial.

And drinking a glass of grapefruit juice may be as beneficial as taking blood sugar-lowering drugs often prescribed for those with type 2 diabetes, the study shows.

“The grapefruit juice lowered blood glucose to the same degree as metformin,” said Joseph Napoli, one of the UC Berkeley researchers who conducted the study, in a University press release. “That means a natural fruit drink lowered glucose levels as effectively as a prescription drug.”

Released on Oct. 8, the study was funded by the California Grapefruit Growers Cooperative. Researchers emphasized the organization had no control or influence over the study or its findings.

The study used slightly sweetened pulp-free grapefruit juice diluted with water. The researchers also added artificial sweeteners to the control group’s water so it would match the calorie content and sweetness of the grapefruit juice.

The mice were fed either a high-fat or low-fat diet for 100 days and their metabolic health was monitored throughout.

The study did not find as big an impact on mice that ate a low-fat diet, though those that drank grapefruit juice had increased insulin sensitivity. Low insulin sensitivity is associated with type 2 diabetes.

“While we’ve long known grapefruit can be part of a healthy diet, the positive findings of this study are encouraging,” said Doug Ackerman, executive director of the Florida Department of Citrus. “We look forward to seeing the results of further research on the health benefits of grapefruit involving human subjects.”

Fresh Florida Grapefruit season typically begins in October and runs through June.

Source: Florida Dept of Citrus

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Antioxidant activity of citrus juices higher than previously indicated http://www.unclematts.com/antioxidant-activity-of-citrus-juices-higher-than-previously-indicated/ Mon, 13 Nov 2017 15:38:49 +0000 http://www.unclematts.com/?p=2868 more]]> Orange juice and juices from other citrus fruits are considered healthy due to their high content of antioxidants, which help to reduce harmful free radicals in our body, but a new investigation shows that their benefits are greater than previously thought.

José Ángel Rufián Henares, professor at the University of Granada, and his team, have developed a technique called ‘global antioxidant response’ (GAR), which includes an in vitro simulation of the gastrointestinal digestion that occurs in our body, whilst taking into account the ‘forgotten’ antioxidant capacity of the solid fraction.

Upon applying the technique to commercial and natural orange, mandarin, lemon and grapefruit juices, it has been proved that their values greatly increase. For example, in the case of orange juice, the value ranges from 2.3 mmol Trolox/L (units for the antioxidant capacity) registered with a traditional technique to 23 mmol Trolox/L with the new GAR method.

“The antioxidant activity is, on average, ten times higher than that which everyone thought up until now, and not just in juices, but also in any other kind of food analysed with this methodology,” highlights Rufián Henares, who notes its possible application: “This technique and the results derived from it could allow dieticians and health authorities to better establish the values of the antioxidant capacity of foods.”

With the help of this method, scientists have also created a mathematical model in order to classify juices according to their natural and storage conditions, which ensures that the correct raw materials and sterilisation and pasteurisation processes are used.

Source: medicalxpress.com

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Fruit juice is not linked to obesity, says study http://www.unclematts.com/orange-juice-and-obesity/ http://www.unclematts.com/orange-juice-and-obesity/#respond Wed, 18 Oct 2017 18:28:44 +0000 http://unclematts.com/?p=2396 more]]> Findings of the meta-analysis support that 100 percent fruit juice consumption by children is not likely linked to obesity.

BARTOW – A new study provides evidence that consumption of 100 percent fruit juice, such as 100% orange juice, was not associated with weight gain in children over the age of 6 and is not expected to have an appreciable effect on weight gain in those under 6, according to a meta-analysis published in Pediatrics, the official journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP).

In a commentary accompanying the study, the authors pointed out that past research shows that fruit juice is part of a high-quality diet, counts as a fruit serving, is convenient, and has a longer shelf life compared to whole fruit. They note that the findings of the meta-analysis support that 100 percent fruit juice consumption by children is not likely linked to obesity. While there are gaps in the literature, they conclude that there is no strong evidence that 100 percent fruit juice should be banned for all children, or in programs such as the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC).

Published in March, the study evaluated research related to the consumption of 100 percent fruit juice and changes in body mass index (BMI) among children ages 1 to 18 years. The meta-analysis comprised eight published studies that included over 34,000 individual children and looked at BMI or the BMI z-score, which indicates how weight changes with height over time and whether the changes are out of proportion with each other.

The study showed that for children age 6 and younger, a small amount of weight gain was observed but the amount was not considered to be clinically significant, meaning that the amount would likely not have any practical, genuine, or noticeable effect. The researchers reasoned that children age 2 and younger may be more susceptible to weight gain from 100 percent juice because it represents a larger proportion of their total daily calorie intake compared to older children. The authors also noted that the primary juice consumed by younger children is apple juice, whereas orange juice is favored by older children and has a lower glycemic load than apple juice. Although more research is needed for children age 6 and under, the AAP’s fruit juice intake guideline limits (4 to 6 ounces for children age 1 through 6 and 8 to 12 ounces for older children) are “prudent and should be followed.”

“The banning of fruit juice or failure to allow it in government food programs outside the first year of life is not consistent with the available evidence,” the authors wrote in their commentary.

References

Auerbach BJ, Wolf FM, Hikida A, Vallila-Buchman P, Littman A, Thompson D, Louden D, Taber DR, Krieger J. Fruit juice and change in BMI: A meta-analysis. Pediatrics. 2017;139(4);e20162454. Published online March 23, 2017.

Abrams SA, Daniels SR. Fruit juice and child health. Pediatrics. 2017;139(4);e20170041. Published online March 23, 2017.

 

Source: Florida Department of Citrus

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High blood pressure? Try a glass of orange juice! http://www.unclematts.com/high-blood-pressure-try-a-glass-of-orange-juice/ http://www.unclematts.com/high-blood-pressure-try-a-glass-of-orange-juice/#respond Tue, 15 Aug 2017 19:36:43 +0000 http://unclematts.com/?p=2347 more]]> Good news for orange lovers: citrus fruit intake has been associated with reduced stroke risk.

The key may lie with a citrus phytonutrient called hesperidin, which appears to increase blood flow throughout the body, including the brain.

Using a machine known as a doppler fluximeter, scientists can measure blood flow through the skin using a laser beam.

If we hook people up to this machine and give them a solution containing the amount of hesperidin found in two cups of orange juice, blood pressure decreases and overall blood flow increases.

Good news for orange lovers: citrus fruit intake has been associated with reduced stroke risk.

When subjects drank straight orange juice instead of the hesperidin solution, their blood flow was even better. In other words, the stroke-reducing effects of oranges extend beyond just the hesperidin.

When it comes to food, the whole is often greater than the sum of its parts.

The positive effects of citrus fruits on blood flow don’t require a machine to measure them. In one study, scientists recruited women who suffered from sensitivity to cold weather due to poor blood flow — women with chronically cold hands, feet and toes — and placed them in a highly air-conditioned room.

The women in the experimental group drank a solution containing actual citrus phytonutrients, while another (control) group drank a placebo (an artificially flavoured orange drink).

The placebo drinkers got colder and colder. Because of decreased blood flow, the temperature of their fingertips dropped nearly 13c during the course of the study.

The fingertips of the women who drank real citrus, meanwhile, cooled less than half as fast, because their blood flow remained steadier.

The researchers also had both groups of women plunge their hands into icy water and saw the citrus drinkers recover about 50 per cent faster than the control group.

Source: DailyMail.co.uk
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